Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Vogue: Running to Catch Up?




This week, Vogue announced that it would no longer employ models who are too young (under 16) or too thin (video here). We have all heard about similar moves by the fashion industry in Italy and France last year. They want to capitalize on what they advertise as socially-conscious thinking. They are part of the solution, not the problem, is the message.

I think the truth is that the media has changed with the internet. We can pick and choose our media distractions and we can even create websites and blogs and be part of the media. This is a rising trend too. And it changes the way women present themselves and the way that women accept being portrayed.

I believe that corporations exist to make money. And they, with big advertising budgets, have enjoyed a lot more power in saying what images are broadcast to us on TV, magazines and movies. I guess that is what is really great about the internet. With it, we can create websites, blogs, begin home-based businesses, post on sites, network, communicate and be heard! And more importantly hear each other. I think what has happened is the corporations have heard us as well - and like all good businesses, they change to meet the changing demands of consumers. (Case in point: recently on Did You Make That? Karen blogged about the stealing of published bloggers' designs by retailers.)
 
Tasia has created a number of amazing patterns from Sewaholic for pear-shaped women. She features pattern testers/models who are all shapes and sizes. Her success lies in her ability to address the needs of her clientele through designing flattering sewing patterns for all sizes. I love her new Cambie pattern especially! Here (and here) are links to two pattern testers modeling the dresses they made and look terrific in their dresses! I can't believe it has taken Vogue and others in fashion so long to see the beauty in women of different sizes, shapes, heights and colour. A number of posters noted that they though the dress was too young for them and had since changed their minds when they viewed the pictures of the models. 

10 comments:

  1. I think the internet can be empowering when it combats media images.

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  2. Did You Make That? Also has a post on the negativity of social media. You turned that on its ear!

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  3. Great tips. It's a good move to not employ models who are underaged. I think there is too much explotation in this modelling world.

    mongs
    mythriftycloset.bom

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  4. I love Vogue. I am sure they are changing with the times, but that isn;t a bad thing. I love the dresses from that website, Nothy.

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  5. Times change and what is considered beautiful does too. I think this is similar to any other fashion shift. I do love the pattern for that dress. I spent quite a while on the sewaholic website. Thanks for the link! By the way, I love your blog too!

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  6. Definitely agree with this, and I think that (along with blogs and social media) home-sewing in general is something that encourages people to look positively at their bodies, since the goal is to change the pattern to fit *you* and not the other way around.

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  7. Definitely agree with this, and I think that (along with blogs and social media) home-sewing in general is something that encourages people to look positively at their bodies, since the goal is to change the pattern to fit *you* and not the other way around.

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    Replies
    1. Good point Meraj. I definitely find it empowering to make my own clothes - that way I can make shirts longer for work. I hate bedning over or reaching for soemthing with my students in the room. They're about 6 years old and they tell you exactly what they see! So I am always more comfortable in clothes I have made to the longer length.

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